Cancer and the three amigos!

by Rosie Bason, Australia. 

Let me introduce you to Susan, Nick and Ingrid, three dear friends of mine who are all friends and have a few things in common. Nick is my Dad, so he really is family, and Susan and Ingrid are family too but we are not related by blood in any way, but the love is there all the same. We often get together and have shared meals and support each other in whatever way we can.

Have a look at these three elders who are all around the same age and what do you see? To me, when I see them, I see the wisdom of their life, I see the glow in them, like something is radiating out of them and I see a joy that is infectious. Continue reading “Cancer and the three amigos!”

Illness and Disease – How Should You Look?

By Nicole Serafin, Tintenbar, NSW

How should we look when we are ill, sick and or in disease? Is there a specific way we should be, or is it that as a society we have become so used to living in a quality that is less than vital on a daily basis that when we do become sick, ill or in disease, our health often plummets considerably and we have nothing left in reserve to sustain or support us?

I recently experienced an illness and made an appointment to see my local GP, presenting with body aches and pains, cold shivers, sweats and a piercing pain in my right lung, which at the time was diagnosed as a viral infection. It was suggested I get some blood tests done in a few days once the acute infection had passed, as I had had similar symptoms a few months before, and the doctor wanted to make sure there was no other underlying disease.

So off I went on my family holiday with my supply of Nurofen and Panadol, thinking the infection would pass in a few days, as it was supposedly just viral – but boy was I wrong. Continue reading “Illness and Disease – How Should You Look?”

Eating humble pie – taking antibiotics for the first time in over 20 years

by Matilda Bathurst, Midwife & Primary School Teacher, UK

I have been beautifully, tenderly and gently humbled this week following a visit to my GP on Monday. For over 3 weeks I had had a cough and was feeling various degrees of unwell, resisting, as is my tendency, really taking care of myself and allowing support from others.

Prompted by a beautiful man in my life, I made the appointment and was guided by my GP to take some antibiotics, in that a cough that persists for over 3 weeks is significant and he could hear a ‘slight crackle’ in the base of my left lung.

For a long time, I have had a disdainful relationship with mainstream medicine, avidly exploring alternative modalities and building an arrogance in myself about mainstream medicine being ‘less’ and below me. So it was with some discomfort and unfamiliarity that I collected my prescription and actually committed to take the tablets. Continue reading “Eating humble pie – taking antibiotics for the first time in over 20 years”

The Body Doesn’t Lie – Being Diagnosed with Osteoporosis

By Inmaculada Cobo Soler, Spain. 

Three years ago, I was diagnosed with very advanced osteoporosis, which led me to enquire honestly about the relationship I had with my body.

I come from a family which fundamentally values two things: a person’s capacity to accomplish great academic achievements or, in the case of not having higher education, the ability to be acclaimed by a natural intelligence and work capacity. The body was a mere instrument to this end, and it could be subjected to sleepless days and nights if needed, sustaining itself with the help of coffee like my father did or, as I used to do, living off my nervous system.

After finishing my higher education and starting work, I did what I thought was taking care of my health by doing road cycling and running half-marathons. Also in the name of health I dedicated many years of my life to learn and practise different kinds of nutrition.

The common denominator of this path has been my body being tyrannised by the demands and wishes of my mind. From the moment I decided what I wanted to do with my body, and left no room for feeling and listening to what my body actually needed, what was supposed to be “healthy” stands as an external imposition, based on ideals and beliefs, and therefore becomes unhealthy.

Continue reading “The Body Doesn’t Lie – Being Diagnosed with Osteoporosis”

Health and Life Today and through the Ages

By Johanna Smith B.Ed, Cert Early Childhood, Teacher, Rockingham, Perth WA.

I recently attended a Universal Medicine event day, where a photo from the 1960’s/70’s was presented alongside a discussion forum around health. This photo was of a group of young people who looked at ease with each other, had genuine smiles on their faces, were of a healthy weight range and their bodies reflected an openness and naturalness. The photo was really pleasant to see and reminded me of the feeling of being free in my body that I had when I was very young – something that could not be faked.

As a whole, we looked at the photo and shared what we saw before us. There was pretty much a consensus that this photo was sharing something that was not commonly seen in today’s society. It was not only showing how the individuals were, but it also revealed how they were with each other, how they felt and more importantly what they were reflecting about life back then. A way of life that, from this photo, seemed to support bodies to look and feel vital, engaged, open and ‘healthy.

Serge Benhayon then presented and facilitated us through a valuable workshop around the word ‘Health’. Much was discussed that was clear and made complete sense, yet some of it I had not really considered before. Continue reading “Health and Life Today and through the Ages”

What is the relationship between intelligence and health?

By Stephen Gammack, BSc 1st Class (Hons), Sydney

What is the relationship between health and intelligence? At the moment it might be said that the two stand separate and distinct, measured individually through various quantifiable tests and examinations, for e.g. a Health Examination and a School Examination. But is our idea of intelligence deeply flawed and far wide of the truth? What if it isn’t found in our ability with academia, but something inextricably linked to our health, the level of wellbeing we live in our bodies, the quality of energy we emanate in our daily life – the relationships and connections we form?

If you could, for example, write a highly academically acclaimed 10,000 word thesis on quantum physics, but at the same time choose to put your body in a state of stress and physical decline through lifestyle choices, then are you an intelligent being? Or to put it another way: are you a ‘being’ acting with your true capacity for intelligence? Maybe our approach to health and intelligence is all messed up and we need to teach, showcase and learn about intelligence from a completely different more self-regarding, or we could say loving, perspective.

The Philosopher Serge Benhayon has presented that our current model of intelligence is flawed, that we don’t think so much as we source thoughts through the movement of our body and that every movement is from one of two pools of energy that either harms (prana), or heals (fire). These energies by energetic law affect everyone, everywhere. To make sense of this requires a willingness to accept and understand that we live in a vast pool of energy and that how we move in every detail – our posture, our gentleness, our awareness, our intentions – influences our thoughts, which in turn create our choices – and that these choices then affect our health outcomes – every movement, every choice, every time. Continue reading “What is the relationship between intelligence and health?”

Self-disregard: can we turn the tide of this modern day plague?

By Jane Keep, London, UK 

Look at any headline in the news, or on social media and you will likely see that the NHS and other healthcare services world-wide are under continuous pressure due to the ever-growing demand from rising illness and disease in their local populations.  And more and more we are learning that illness and disease is linked to lifestyle. Given this, what is the trajectory looking like? If it continues to increase as it is, due to the way we are living our lives, the rising tide of illness and disease will overwhelm healthcare and bankrupt governments, reducing the productivity of our cities, nations, and the world as we become a society dependent upon needing care for our ailments and woes.

There are definitely times when we need to call on the support of healthcare, and my observations of working in the NHS for 38 years now, show that healthcare professionals work exceptionally hard to deliver the best services they can.

One of the issues healthcare professionals face is the tiny amount of time they have with each patient. Often appointments are booked on a continuous conveyor belt of one in, one out, with little time to discuss anything beyond the presenting issue. All the while during their busy days, healthcare professionals will observe patients and they will likely be aware of some lifestyle factors that may be contributing to their patients’ lack of health and wellbeing.

Continue reading “Self-disregard: can we turn the tide of this modern day plague?”