Self-disregard: can we turn the tide of this modern day plague?

By Jane Keep, London, UK 

Look at any headline in the news, or on social media and you will likely see that the NHS and other healthcare services world-wide are under continuous pressure due to the ever-growing demand from rising illness and disease in their local populations.  And more and more we are learning that illness and disease is linked to lifestyle. Given this, what is the trajectory looking like? If it continues to increase as it is, due to the way we are living our lives, the rising tide of illness and disease will overwhelm healthcare and bankrupt governments, reducing the productivity of our cities, nations, and the world as we become a society dependent upon needing care for our ailments and woes.

There are definitely times when we need to call on the support of healthcare, and my observations of working in the NHS for 38 years now, show that healthcare professionals work exceptionally hard to deliver the best services they can.

One of the issues healthcare professionals face is the tiny amount of time they have with each patient. Often appointments are booked on a continuous conveyor belt of one in, one out, with little time to discuss anything beyond the presenting issue. All the while during their busy days, healthcare professionals will observe patients and they will likely be aware of some lifestyle factors that may be contributing to their patients’ lack of health and wellbeing.

Continue reading “Self-disregard: can we turn the tide of this modern day plague?”

What if the human life span keeps increasing?

by Rebecca Briant, Student and Receptionist, London, UK

The average life expectancy of humans is increasing at an unprecedented rate. Seen as one of the great achievements of the century, in the last 40 years alone it has risen by 10 years, and in 2011 life expectancy at birth was almost double what it was in 1841(1). But what will happen if our life span continues to increase, and how can we address the issues we will face?

As most people know, with age there comes a natural deterioration of the body. However, what we are already witnessing, and will see more of should trends continue to increase, is an unmanageable presence of chronic, multi-symptomatic conditions in our elderly and increasingly in younger people, which create a huge economic strain on the NHS. The annual cost of health and social care is far higher for elderly people, with more than two-fifths of the national health budget in the UK devoted to people over 65(2) and the number of older people in need of care is projected to rise by more than 60% in the next 20 years(3).

This strain will not be limited to the NHS alone, but will reach into wider society. In the UK the ratio of people of working age to people over 65 could fall from 3.7:1 in 1999 to 2.1:1 in 2040. This has the potential to drive up taxes for those in work, to be able to fund the increasing health and social care spending on the older population(4). There are also the implications on the wider health and social care systems to find long term care for the patients once they are discharged.

Continue reading “What if the human life span keeps increasing?”

From Seeking the ‘Perfect Body Shape’ to Finding My Body Perfectly Beautiful as it is…

By Susan Lee, Norfolk.

I have always had an ambivalent relationship with my body – I compared it and judged it against what I felt was the ideal shape and size as presented by the media, celebrities and the world around me. Even as a young girl I felt this dissatisfaction and was aware that my body was pear shaped and I was always wishing that my legs would miraculously change – and this was an underlying preoccupation that was always running just beneath the surface. I was deeply dissatisfied with myself and I am now realising that it was very painful to reject my own body in this way. At the time I had no idea how important my relationship with my body could be – or that in fact I could have an intimate and meaningful relationship with my body. I also felt that if I had ‘the perfect body shape’ then life and my relationships would likewise be ‘perfect’.

Later in my life I began to lose weight and change shape – my ‘pear’ was disappearing and I was delighted! I found it easier to buy clothes and felt more attractive and sexy. My diet had changed too as I was beginning to look at how I lived life and the effect that food had on my body and the way my body metabolised what I was eating. Looking back on this stage of my life it was more about control, so that I could look a certain way, than really feeling into what would support my body. I listened to the advice of others and did not trust myself to know what would support me to change the deep dissatisfaction I had about myself. Continue reading “From Seeking the ‘Perfect Body Shape’ to Finding My Body Perfectly Beautiful as it is…”

Opening of my heart

By Irene Sheard, Aged care worker and grandmother, Goonellabah

We often hear the phrase “opening our heart” but what does it truly mean?

There are a lot of references about the heart such as hard hearted, mean hearted, cold hearted, and of course the one many aspire to, “open hearted”. I have always considered myself a fairly “kind hearted” person who cared about others and made myself available to help others whenever I could. It is easy and convenient to think of ourselves in this way as we then don’t have to change anything and can keep living our life in the same old way, but how true is this perception of ourselves?  Could what we think is our heart be an emotional part of us and not the original loving heart?

I have been unfolding this question for some years now by attending presentations by Serge Benhayon, the founder of Universal Medicine.

One of the first things I realised by attending these presentations is that I am already everything that is glorious and loving and that the parts of me that I think I am are only cover ups that I have learnt to live by, to literally cover up my hurts.  I then believe that I am this person, whether it be a positive belief, such as “I am loving and caring” or a negative belief that I am “a horrible person who hurts others”.

Continue reading “Opening of my heart”

Healing cardiovascular disease with medicine and love

By Mike Stevenson, Retired, Sandhurst UK,

In March 2015 I enjoyed attending the Universal Medicine Retreat in Vietnam, during which we were introduced to the concept of constellations with people and events in and throughout our lives. Little did I realise at the time how I would benefit from an important constellation that occurred towards the end of the event.

Midway through the celebration dinner I started to feel very ill, experienced severe vision problems and subsequently went into a state of collapse.

Attending the dinner were several students of Universal Medicine who were also Medical Doctors and they immediately came to my aid and sent for an ambulance.

In spite of my body going into shock, I felt no fear or anxiety, even though I heard them saying that my pulse was weak and my heart rate had dropped very low.
Continue reading “Healing cardiovascular disease with medicine and love”

Living Miracles in the 21st Century

By Maree Savins, Australia

In the cynical 21st Century, most of us no longer believe in miracles. Yet every day, miracles occur.

We know Jesus had the ability to help people heal, such that he is known as the “Great Physician”.  These healings were celebrated as miracles.  He was celebrated as having special powers.  Jesus was glorified by many, and yet there was something about him that was grounded, living from an inner stillness, and a simplicity that emanated from his being and in his life.

What the writings about Jesus have failed to explore was that Jesus was a human being just like us, and because we are all born equal, what this means is that we all have the ability to heal ourselves and support others to heal as well.  You can call it super powers if you want – but it’s just part of who we are.  I’m not talking about turning water into wine or walking on water, but everyday miracles about people transforming their lives by embracing and expressing Love.

Wouldn’t it be beautiful if we each lived each day knowing and living this knowing?  How would it change our everyday life? Continue reading “Living Miracles in the 21st Century”

Oral Health

By Amita Khurana, BSc Honours, Hotel Business Owner, Director, Practitioner, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, UK

A few months ago, after a gap of several years, I decided to go to the dentist for an oral checkup. I wanted to go have my teeth checked and polished, as I had changed the way I was living and taking care of myself.

During my visit I was advised I had gum disease, as my gums were bleeding and quite tender. My dentist advised me to use a particular mouthwash twice a day, but not at the same time as I brushed my teeth.

Whilst I was having my teeth cleaned, I remembered a presentation I had heard from Universal Medicine where there was a mention of bleeding gums and that energetically this was a sign of disregard. This was a great wake-up call for me to reflect on where I was being disregarding in my life and for how long had I been like this, including avoiding going to the dentist. In that moment I decided to make a change; I listened to my dentist’s advice and on the way out booked another appointment for a follow-up. I purchased the mouthwash and medicated toothpaste. Continue reading “Oral Health”