Tooth wisdom

by Joseph Barker, Web designer, writer and doodler, Melbourne, Australia

As I lay back in the seat, a nurse placed a cover over me. I took one last look at the picturesque scene of the sun setting out the window before a great big screen was moved in front of my face. “I don’t want to disturb you, but what you see next may make you upset” said Doctor Max. Then he switched on the screen to display the full uncensored, gruesome scene. What was in front of me was a close up of my teeth. Bacteria and build up was everywhere, all over the inside of my mouth, in between the gums bubbling away like some Icelandic water spa.

This made me sit up a little stiff in my seat. How had this happened? After all they looked good to me, and hey, don’t you know, I don’t even eat sweets! But as Doctor Max asked me a few further questions, it became clear my teeth regime was not quite as squeaky clean as it seemed. “Do you brush inside and out every tooth?” “Do you methodically floss in between?” “Do you spend an equal time in every spot?” “Do you you always brush with care?” Well…no. I had to admit, that I did not, more often settling for a quick scrub around whilst thinking of something that happened to me that day.
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The Test of Life

by Leigh Matson, London, UK 

In life, we are always presented with opportunities to test ourselves and to learn from the results of these experiments. The quality of the experiments will vary, depending on how willing we are to be aware of what we are feeling.

For example, finding out if we have a food intolerance can be quite simple.

If we eat a certain food – we may get a reaction.

If we don’t eat that certain food – there is no reaction.

It simply requires us to stop for a moment to clock our body’s communication in response or reaction to this food.

If we were to eliminate the foods we react to for a period of time, we could then see and feel the results by feeling the effects in our bodies.

Unfortunately, we live in a world where we are taught to override and ignore these reactions, or messages from our bodies. So even though we may have a bodily reaction, we have been taught how to override these messages, so we can eat ‘normally’ and appear to be normal.

When I was young I could not eat gluten, because it caused various reactions such as a reddening of my face and a number of mood and behavioral disorders and 20 years ago gluten free food was not as readily available as it is now. So over time I learnt how to override and ‘grow out of’ being gluten intolerant. But what if we don’t ‘grow out of’ being intolerant, we just get better at masking the reaction?

Since I have eliminated gluten (and also dairy and sugar) from my diet, I have found that my energy levels, general health and wellbeing have increased.

So then what if we could apply this method of experimenting with ourselves to other areas of life?

Continue reading “The Test of Life”

To pee or not to pee – should that even be a question?

By Coleen Hensey

I was recently advised by my GP to keep an eye on my blood pressure as we worked together to find the causes of some health issues that had arisen.

After attending a specialist appointment one lovely, warm day, I took myself for a rainforest walk and then walked my gorgeous labradoodle to the local dog park. We were both thirsty from our walks so I shared my water with my dog, who was most appreciative. I was feeling lovely – connected with nature and purposeful in having started to attend to these matters of personal health.

I felt so good that I decided to pop into the local pharmacy before going home and have my blood pressure measured, so that I would have a reference for ‘feeling lovely.’

My friendly pharmacist welcomed me warmly, as always, and we attached the sleeve to my arm to measure my current blood pressure. As the sleeve deflated and the reading appeared on the screen, I observed how the pharmacist had started to mask a sense of alarm: the diastolic reading (the bottom number) was registering a reading of hypertensive crisis – 124. (1) My usual reading is around 75-80. The systolic pressure was also higher than usual for me, but not alarmingly so.
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Healing my Separation to Humanity through Illness

By Susan Evans, Student, Mullumbimby NSW

A year ago I was diagnosed with lung cancer. Initially I was very shocked, as over the last 5 years I have made many lifestyle changes and have been living in a much more healthy way and was beginning to nurture and care for myself on a much deeper level.

Over time, I came to a deep acceptance and understanding that this was a culmination of the poor choices I had made, as a result of holding on to and not dealing with my hurts for the past 54 years of my life. It was not easy at first to let go of the habits and choices I had become accustomed to, but little by little, my connection to my body deepened and I began making more loving choices. I realised that this diagnosis was going to be an opportunity for me to clear all that was no longer a part of me.

The prognosis was positive as the cancer was caught early, but I was advised it would involve major surgery to remove one third of my lung. Continue reading “Healing my Separation to Humanity through Illness”

The Power of Physiotherapy and Universal Medicine in Palliative Care

by Gill Randall, Physiotherapist, Grad Dip Phys, Banbury, UK

I work as a physiotherapist in palliative care. Now, physiotherapy and palliative care are not always words that we might put together. I have often received perplexed looks when telling people where I work initially, and the response often comes with ‘how sad and dreary that must be’, but no, on the contrary, that is not true. However, I do understand their confusion. Physiotherapy is associated with healing, recovering, getting better, or rehabilitation. Palliative care can imply coming towards the end of life, giving up or giving in at the end of the journey. But I consider that we all have the opportunity to learn or to feel a difference in life, right until our last breath, and in the hospice environment, we aim to keep people as well as possible, even in the last days of life.

Life is the journey that we are all on to learn and to evolve. This isn’t a ladder going upwards, it’s often a reflection back for us to observe. Continue reading “The Power of Physiotherapy and Universal Medicine in Palliative Care”

Appreciating a western medicine practitioner and more…

by Coleen Hensey 

Witnessing the media comments on both doctors and the healthcare system in Australia, I feel to share a recent personal experience of Western medicine in action, which was nothing short of exceptional.

I had been diagnosed with hypothyroidism a few years ago but had felt that my body was becoming devitalised in spite of the medication, a synthetic type of thyroxine prescribed routinely for this condition in Australia. I was losing weight rapidly, had dark circles under my eyes, my blood pressure and sleep cycle were very erratic and I was, by turns, racy or had little energy to do anything, including activities I absolutely love. My body was clearly indicating something was awry, so I decided to look more deeply into what was happening with my health.

This proved to be a great decision on many, many levels.

I referred myself to a local endocrine specialist to discuss and address the possible causes for the change in my health. The doctor I met with listened attentively and respectfully to what I shared about my symptoms and treatment to date, asking clarifying questions and making notes throughout. In itself, this respect for me as a patient who knew my body, was very confirming. His avowed philosophy was that the patient is the one who holds the keys to both the aetiology of their illness and to their healing. I had a clear sense that this doctor knew how to exercise true patient care. Continue reading “Appreciating a western medicine practitioner and more…”

Osteoporosis – how could this happen to me?

by Francene Cartaar, Australia

I recently suffered a shock – the shock of being informed that at the age of 54 I had osteoporosis in my back and also bone weakness in my hips. My reaction to the news from my GP was to ask myself: ‘How could this have happened to me?’

I realised that I held a perception that osteoporosis only occurred in ‘older’ women who did not look after themselves. As I regarded myself as a ‘healthy’ person, this diagnosis did not fit in with the image I held of myself.  My GP explained that bones could regenerate with weight bearing exercise and that vitamin and mineral supplements were also beneficial. The diagnosis and explanation left me feeling unsettled and upset.

I subsequently decided that I wanted to understand this diagnosis from an energetic perspective so I decided to consult an Exercise Physiologist who also had a deeper understanding of the body on an energetic level from her studies with Universal Medicine. Continue reading “Osteoporosis – how could this happen to me?”