Why Does Humanity Have Dementia?

By Richard Mills, Training Manager, Lightwater, Surrey UK

There is a tendency for us to look at a person who has an illness, disease or condition, and attribute the fact to the individual. This may be valid and perfectly understandable and there may well be individual factors – genes, lifestyle choices and the like – that make that person more susceptible to such things. Research into these factors is certainly very appropriate. But rather than looking at the person solely from the individual perspective, might we equally ask ourselves why do we have dementia? Or why do we have autism? Why do we have cancer or diabetes?

Do we only take note of particular situations when they begin to affect us directly, or someone close to us? Maybe it would be helpful if we looked at humanity as one body rather than as the 7.5 billion individual people we currently see ourselves as. What is the increase in breast cancer telling us as a race? What is the incidence of prostate cancer in men saying to all men? What does autism tell us about how we are living? Or heart disease? How would life look if we accepted that as well as our individual bodies, we are also part of One Body that is all of us together? Continue reading “Why Does Humanity Have Dementia?”

The prevention of breast cancer – the answer is in our bodies

by Rebecca Briant, Receptionist and Politics Student, London UK

Recently I undertook a research project at Bath University, looking at the effect epigenetics can have on the formation of breast cancer. What I found was really amazing, and very relevant given the current trends of breast cancer worldwide.

Breast cancer is now so common it is hard to find someone who is untouched by the disease either directly or indirectly through friends and family. It has become the enemy within and women across the board are now encouraged to check their breasts for any sign of breast disease. October has become synonymous with pink ribbons and raising money for breast cancer research.

I have seen so much in the news and in general about the few options available for women with breast cancer when it comes to treatment and prevention. The most common option for treatment, and now also for prevention, is the removal of the breasts, and sometimes the ovaries too, even before any cancer is diagnosed, if the women are deemed to be at high risk of developing the disease.

Scientists have isolated the ‘breast cancer gene’ and can give genetic counselling to women with this gene as to what their options are. However, what I have found interesting is that the research or information I talk about below is seemingly not taken into consideration, let alone placed equally alongside all other treatments and preventatives. Continue reading “The prevention of breast cancer – the answer is in our bodies”

Healing Fibromyalgia with Esoteric Connective Tissue Therapy and Conventional Medicine

 By SD, medical administrator, UK

A few years ago, I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia, a condition that has both chronic pain and chronic fatigue as its markers.

I had been experiencing pain in my legs for which I was seeking the perfect pair of shoes to remedy, and deep exhaustion for which I was supplementing myself with plenty of sugary foods to keep me going.

But these coping mechanisms eventually could not stand against the tide of fibromyalgia which came crashing down around me. There came a moment when I looked down at the page on my work station and saw the words spinning; by the time I got home I could hardly move or breathe.

The next few months were spent trying to figure out what was ‘wrong with me’ until eventually the doctor gave the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. He said it was a chronic condition, that I would spend the rest of my life in pain, and then he prescribed me some anti-depressants and referred me to a physiotherapist and a consultant who specialises in chronic pain.

Continue reading “Healing Fibromyalgia with Esoteric Connective Tissue Therapy and Conventional Medicine”

Constipation – it’s not sexy but we do need to let go!

By Jane Keep, London, UK. 

As a little girl I was regularly constipated. It was painful and uncomfortable. On and off through my life I continued to have bouts of constipation, although this is very rare nowadays.

When I was constipated, I could feel the strain and tension this put on my whole body, not just my bowels and their opening (or not)! I felt sluggish, lethargic, at times restless and my skin and hair were dull.

It’s odd when you consider it – if someone asked me to store my garbage bin in my bedroom I’d shriek with horror. Or if someone asked me to have a bath in water amongst the contents of my food recycle bin I’d cringe with disgust, yet, constipation is holding onto waste material that is no longer natural for the body to hold onto. If we would not have our garbage in our bedroom, then why would we want to hold onto waste in our body longer than is natural? We can shower, bathe and be clean on the outside, but if we are holding onto waste on the inside, our health will still be affected despite the outer appearances.

Constipation is a common condition, affecting people of all ages. Simply defined it means that we are not passing stools regularly, or that we are unable to completely empty our bowel. Other symptoms can include stomach aches, cramps, feeling bloated, nauseous, sick, and a loss of appetite.1 Continue reading “Constipation – it’s not sexy but we do need to let go!”

“Hello Thyroid”

by Dianne Trussell, BSc Hons, science & health educator & writer

How often do we think about our thyroid glands? Probably only when something goes wrong. Me too, but looking back, ever since puberty or earlier, my thyroid gland has probably been a little bit sluggish. Not pathological, just ‘not firing on all cylinders’. I used to need a lot of sleep, feel the cold, had cold hands and feet, poor digestion, put on weight easily which I found difficult to shift, plus my hormones were out of balance… these are all signs associated with low-ish thyroid activity. Ironically I had enormous amounts of energy for my high levels of physical and mental activity, from waking to bed-time, in contradiction to the pattern of low thyroid, which usually goes with poor energy levels. I was evidently getting my energy from somewhere else – and in retrospect I’d say it was nervous energy that kept me going.

Seemingly unconnected to these low thyroid signs, I did not want to eat broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower or beans. Something in my body didn’t want them, and I did not like the smell or taste of these foods, so it was easy for me to not eat them. That is still true today, and they make my body very uncomfortable for a few days if I consume them.

Fast forward to recently when I discovered that these foods are known to suppress thyroid function! So for me (not necessarily everyone) with my low-ish thyroid, they may not be suitable as regular dietary choices. Obviously my body knew this, even way back as a child, maybe even before scientific research brought us this information.

Continue reading ““Hello Thyroid””

Breast cancer: does medical research really bring us the truth or just a part of it?

By Julie Snelgrove, Nursery Nurse, Somerset, UK

 

A little while ago on my facebook newsfeed there was an article titled:

“Alcohol is a direct cause of seven forms of cancer, finds studyThe Guardian. 22 July, 20161

There is now enough credible evidence to say conclusively that drinking is a direct cause of the disease…”

One of the cancers mentioned was Breast Cancer. I was interested in what was being said as a few years ago I was diagnosed with Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS), which is a pre-breast cancer condition that is treated in the same way as breast cancer. The question that came to mind was “Ok it’s good these links are being made as we need to know this, but isn’t the next and real question: ‘Why do we choose to drink alcohol in the first place’?” Are we not short changing ourselves when we simply read and take on only what these studies say, rather than coming back to what our bodies have been telling us for a long time?

So ok, I can be responsible, and listen to what the research tells us and choose to not drink alcohol, but does this mean I change any other behaviours in my life?

Do I look at my stress levels?

My emotional state?

The quality of my relationships?

Does it mean I will then deeply care for myself?

It might be we then actually eat more to numb ourselves, drink other stimulating drinks or eat more sugar. I know when I stopped alcohol I found other ways to bring stimulation and numbness to my body just as alcohol used to. There was no self-responsibility present in my life to look any deeper.

Continue reading “Breast cancer: does medical research really bring us the truth or just a part of it?”

Lifestyle choices and responsibility for our healthcare – whose hands is it in?

by Jane Keep, Phd, Mphil, MSc, FCIPD, MIC, CMgr, FCMI, London

A while ago, a healthcare organisation in the UK made a decision that it would no longer treat patients who are obese or who smoke – unless they have been/are on a programme to do something about it. This caused quite a disturbance at the time, in that many felt this was unfair and discriminatory. This tactic has been tried before, and each time it causes a bristle of comments, discussion and reactions.

The NHS in England has always been ‘free to patients at the point of delivery’ so whilst there is no charge for treatment, there has always been struggles to resource the NHS to be able to treat all the patients that need treating. In recent years the numbers of those needing care have escalated, and the NHS is now bursting at the seams and in financial deficit.

If we look at this further – ‘according to the Hippocratic tradition, the guiding principle for physicians is “first do no harm,” or non-maleficence, which is closely followed by the obligation to “do good,” or beneficence’.(1) It has been stated that ‘irrespective of the “rightness” of smoking behavior, physicians have a duty to offer all patients appropriate care and supportive care and to help their patients become tobacco free.’(1) This means that ‘physicians are discouraged from refusing treatment simply because they disagree with their patients’ decisions or lifestyles’.(1)

Continue reading “Lifestyle choices and responsibility for our healthcare – whose hands is it in?”