We see what we want to see …

By Gabriele Conrad, Goonellabah, NSW

I had quite an eye opener of an experience the other day. And eye opener is the appropriate term here, as it showed me firsthand and very tangibly what I had known for a long time about how we use our eyes.

I work as a book editor and a colleague had sent me two lines of a text with a typo in it to add to my collection of errata for its second edition; I had quickly skimmed the email and gleaned that there was an ‘r’ in the wrong place.

When I got back to the email a couple of days later I ended up staring at those two lines for a long while; I just could not spot the typo. May I add here that I have a lot of experience in this area; you could say that I am a pro. But no matter how hard I tried, I could not see the typo. There was no ‘r’ out of place, no matter how often I examined these two lines of text. And here they are:

They key to any minor or major problem is

to find the simplicity that has been ignored.

Serge Benhayon, Esoteric Teachings & Revelations, Volume II, ed. 1, p 367

I was very puzzled; extremely puzzled and confused. How come I could not spot this simple and straightforward typo, one that somebody had already pointed out?

I kept looking at the text, looking and looking and looking. And then something must have shifted and when I looked at it again, I could, all of a sudden, see that the typo was in the first word and that it was ‘they’ instead of ‘the’. And thus, it now reads:

The key to any minor or major problem is

to find the simplicity that has been ignored.

Serge Benhayon, Esoteric Teachings & Revelations, Volume II, ed. 1, p 367

 

What had happened? I had certainly ignored the simplicity of just seeing what was there to be seen and while I had been looking for the aberrant ‘r’, gone into the pursuit with the intention to find and track down this ‘r’, my vision had been very narrow, blinkered and aimed solely at the one and only thing, hunting down this elusive ‘r’. This had rendered me completely incapable of seeing anything else outside my narrow focus.

Or, to put it another way: I had gone into the looking, staring and searching with a preconceived idea, a judgment, an opinion, an image of what I was going to find, i.e. an aberrant ‘r’.

Taking a broader view, this is in no way trivial – it means that we only see what we want to see and don’t and can’t see what we don’t want to see; but what really happens is that we have actually seen it and everything with and around it but have just as quickly dismissed what does not fit the picture of what we are expecting to find. If someone says the earth is flat, then no volume of scientific proof will sway them otherwise until such time that they are ready to see beyond their belief system and conviction and thus willing to more truly see.

In other words: while we will all eventually see the whole truth, it is always by choice and, most importantly, in our own time. The perceived blinkered stubbornness or ignorance is a mental construct, a mental cage that has rendered the senses incapable of seeing what there is so obviously to see – in the eyes of those who don’t wear the same set of blinkers.

Back to the eyes: can we now see that we make them look for clues, information, material and especially confirmation of what we think we already know, are comfortable and familiar with and will even defend and fight for?

We use our eyes to pull ‘evidence’ in to support a past choice, no matter whether that choice is only a moment or years, even lifetimes ago. Vision has become part of the scaffolding that holds everything up and together and makes it, in our opinion and within our set of beliefs and images, mentally congruent.

We then use the eyes to reject anything that does not fit the picture, does not fit in with what it is that we want, demand and absolutely need to see. The term ‘confirmation bias’ describes our tendency, if not straightforward and linear urge, to favour ‘evidence’ and clues that fit our preconceived idea of what we deem is true, fervently need to be true, so that our picture of the world stays intact.

We use our eyes to feed the illusion that we are right and others are wrong, that our way is the right way, and even the only way, that we are separate from and different from other people, when in truth we are all one and the same.

In conclusion, here is a quote from Sermon 55, The Way of The Livingness, by Serge Benhayon, also the author of the quote above, as delivered in Wollongbar on 16 December 2017:

“Our senses are not truly or not predominantly responding to life,

they are displaying what they are pitched to experience.” (Serge Benhayon)

When we start to use our sight and other senses to respond to life, guided by what we feel, before and above all else, then we will start to develop true sight, which comes second and confirms the knowing of our inner-heart and the what is, the place where we are one.

Read more:

  1. Seeing is believing – or is it? 
  2. Seeing the whole from the heart

 

328 thoughts on “We see what we want to see …

  1. It’s so interesting how we can be so convinced about what we think we see, when in fact we are not always seeing with absolute clarity what is actually in front of us. But when we use our sense of feeling there is no denying what is there to be felt.

  2. “Our senses are not truly or not predominantly responding to life, they are displaying what they are pitched to experience.” When we really get this, it will fundamentally change our understanding of our perceptions and experiences as an individual. Are we just TV sets receiving images from some invisible broadcasting centre somewhere in the 4th dimension, or are we amplifiers for the love of our 5th dimensional Soul?

  3. This simple example shows how misled or blinded we are when we believe what we are told – ie what is ‘normal’ or ‘right’, rather than being open to more truly seeing beyond that accepted comfort.

  4. It suits us to be ignorantly blind to life as it feeds our illusion and thus lie of individuality. Take it grander and you immediately start to see that there is no room for self at the expense of any other. And this is a responsibility we seek to avoid.

  5. We ‘see’ with much more than our eyes because our body is an amazing sensing instrument. I notice that when I wear my glasses, which I do all day as I am very short sighted, my eyes get tired because I am always trying to look through and focus on what is physically in front of me. When I am somewhere relaxed and don’t need to see so well, if I take my glasses off, there is a different sensation: I am not ‘trying’ to see anything and am feeling more. If someone is in front of me at the time, I pick up different things about them and not just their physical features.

  6. The fact it happens so quickly, it is so easy to miss and get caught in what we think we see. But there is choice to catch and see through the illusion that happens when we rely on our eyes seeing out. Our sense of feeling always gives us confirmation of what is true.

  7. It’s like we are walking around with sunglasses on with made up pictures printed on the lenses. Whilst we might be very convinced by their seeming reality – all we simply need to do is stop and take them off.

  8. Thank you, Gabriele, for the simple but profoundly important reminder to feel and discern what is going on in our bodies first and foremost, so we don’t get duped by what appears to be in front of us or limit our vision to what we want to see.

  9. How about the man look? We men have an ability not to see the obvious and that which was always in plain sight. Could this be a way to avoid something we were asked to do that did not fit our picture of what we had planned?

  10. I am learning more and more that going into anything with pre-conceived ideas and pictures just sets us up for disappointment and reaction when things don’t work out as expected. Being really open however is a great place to approach life from.

  11. Sometimes it is easy to be swayed by our feelings and when we build a resistance to wayward-swaying energy then we can become Loving in our humble-appreciative-ness of being sensitive beings who do feel-much-more than we see.

  12. Thank you Gabriele, for this gorgeous blog – an eye opener indeed! And one that was very timely for me today as I was seeing something that was not actually there to be seen with the eye of truth and reading what you have written has supported me to understand how this has worked.

    1. It happens in a split second, less than a split second and has become second nature, first nature probably – we tell our senses what it is they are to see, hear, smell, sense. We then become the prisoners of the way we have fashioned and moulded our senses to be.

  13. Essentially what we see is governed by the energy that is running us. This energy then conditions us to see what it wants us to see, which more often than not is NOT the truth of the matter.

  14. When the blindfold does eventually come off, we will realise that we have been living in what’s tantamount to the energetic equivalent of a small shoebox, so confined is our view of life.

    1. so well said Alexis. The way we have constructed life to the detail is reductionism to the max, everything reduced and minimalised, and put into boxes, and linearity which is so far from the truth of who we are. No wonder we feel constant tension and unsettlement in our bodies day in day out – as we are living in a box rather than the grandness we truly are.

      1. Reductionism at play – of course, it had never even occurred to me. Reduction and supremacy, very potent tools of the illusion that we are human only.

  15. ‘while we will all eventually see the whole truth, it is always by choice and, most importantly, in our own time.’ We can of course delay our awareness and many do, we can get distracted and dull our senses with food and other activities. It is only when we look back and see how far we have come that we can appreciate our evolution to date.

  16. An awesome sharing Gabrielle! “The key to any minor or major problem is
    to find the simplicity that has been ignored.
    Serge Benhayon, Esoteric Teachings & Revelations, Volume II, ed. 1, p 367”
    Ive read many times and gotta put it on the wall. We certainly do see what we want to see. Responding to life with a focus on simplicity is an amazing thing that sets us free.

  17. We are also renowned for hearing what we want to hear, so coupled with your example Gabriele, just goes to prove that our senses are not reliable conveyors truth if we have not connected in our inner knowing first and learnt to observe all of what we see, hear and feel and not just run with the bits that fit our agendas.

    1. Great point – we run with what fits our agenda, our pictures and images. And by doing that, we keep ourselves small and in fact, virtually blind to what is truly going on.

  18. We definitely see whatever we want to see, and then complicate it all the more to make things into something they are not, and wonder why we get into such a muddle. Serge Benhayon’s quotes are always to the point, simplicity, which is often dismissed is so obviously the key.

  19. ‘We use our eyes to feed the illusion that we are right and others are wrong, that our way is the right way, and even the only way, that we are separate from and different from other people, when in truth we are all one and the same.’ – Brilliantly said Gabriele – and to keep the illusion going we add stubbornness and pride… how willing are we to admit that we were ‘wrong’, even when deep down we know it?

  20. ‘We use our eyes to feed the illusion that we are right and others are wrong, that our way is the right way, and even the only way, that we are separate from and different from other people, when in truth we are all one and the same.’ It is often the case that, when someone expresses a different opinion, that we go into judgement of who is right or wrong. There is only Truth.

  21. It is interesting how we miss things when we focus on one part. The first time I read the blog I didn’t even really receive the quote – I was just looking for the error. But this time I simply read the quote and it brought me back to how powerful simplicity is rather than getting hooked on a missing letter.

    1. Well said HM, Gabiele’s example was classic and I think many of us fell for looking for the rogue ‘r’ when there was none to find…and in so missed the quote itself AND the extra ‘y’ that was the so called error. But our real error was the way we went about seeking what we did, as opposed to staying open and seeing it all. Amazing learning!

  22. We see what we want to see and don’t see what we don’t want to see. It is so very worthwhile wanting to see what is true for in that life transforms in many glorious and unexpected ways.

  23. Beautiful to be supported by someone who brings clarity and simplicity to a problem previously wrestled with. Confirmed beautifully in this quote

    “The key to any minor or major problem is
    to find the simplicity that has been ignored.”
    Serge Benhayon, Esoteric Teachings & Revelations, Volume II, ed. 1, p 367

  24. How very true – the images we receive are entirely dependent on the lens through which we look. The eyes alone are not an accurate portrayal of truth, thus why truth needs to be discerned with the ‘eyes of the heart’ so that what we see is in accord to what we feel and if not then we must remember that while our eyes can indeed play tricks on us, the inner heart never lies.

  25. We see what we want to see, we hear what we want to hear.. we create our own reality on the extent to which we are prepared to be honest with ourselves, and others.

    1. Being prepared to start looking at how much dishonesty I run with, it has been quite shocking to feel the extent of it. The beauty is that when we start to open up to correcting this the reflections can come thick and fast to learn from.

  26. “…can we now see that we make them look for clues, information, material and especially confirmation of what we think we already know, are comfortable and familiar with and will even defend and fight for?” – This sentence alone explains the major problem with the approach of modern evidence-based science and medicine, for it shows how the result of experiments are directly correlated to the expected outcomes, and especially those that millions or even billions of dollars are riding on to substantiate in order for the funding and development of certain drugs or for continuation of a scientists grant money and notoriety.

  27. We can have our blinkers on and it totally changes our perception of what we are seeing. For instance, have you ever read an email expecting the person on the other end to criticise or say you have done something wrong or haven’t understood, and then when you read the email it actually reads as if you are being criticised? Then a couple of days later when the reaction has died down you re-read the email and it reads differently without any judgments towards yourself and seems perfectly feasible.

  28. This was really lovely to read. So lovely I had to re-read it a couple of times because of the wisdom within it ‘When we start to use our sight and other senses to respond to life, guided by what we feel, before and above all else, then we will start to develop true sight, which comes second and confirms the knowing of our inner-heart and the what is, the place where we are one’.

  29. There is so much that we choose not to see and we don’t. One example is that as young children most of us could sense and often see evidence of something beyond the physical realm most adults accept and talk about. Many of us were scared of beings we called monsters and such. Yet since everyone simply ridicules this awareness, most of us chose to no longer be open to seeing at that level.

    1. I suspect that we do actually see all that we choose to not see but may not be aware of what we have seen. It is along the lines of how we feel everything but are not always aware of just how much we have felt. Therefore we are still affected by everything we see and feel but if we choose to not be aware of it we are affected by it in an adverse way. Being aware of all that we see and feel is the greatest liberation.

      1. Great point Nicola. We in effect receive it All anyway. But it is up to us whether we accept that awareness or not. We are choosing our own personalised blind spots!

  30. and the way we see starts with our relationship with ourselves – if we are not living honestly with ourselves, observing, and learning, then we will not be able to see in full what is going on around us.

    1. good point – and we are not nurtured and raised from young to realise we have more senses than sight, hearing, smell, taste etc – in fact we are actually one big ‘sensing’ vehicle that senses and reads so much more than we realise. To reduce this to controlling even the 5 senses is to live a life of reductionism.

  31. Because we see what we want to see because of a preconceived picture we must miss out on so much in life that is so very important in moving us forward and it is even crazier that we have actually seen it but just not taken it in because of that picture.

  32. There are two reasons in particular that I love this blog Gabriele, first of all this is the perfect example of how we see only that which we are looking for or want to see, and I, like many others couldn’t see the typo and was intent on finding the “r” and on realising the actual error I was blown away with how profound was this offering, it stopped me in my tracks and made me really consider what I choose to see or not to see….and then I read Serge’s beautiful quote, without the typo, and again was deeply touched by the depth of learning and understanding being offered.

    “The key to any minor or major problem is
    to find the simplicity that has been ignored.”
    Serge Benhayon, Esoteric Teachings & Revelations, Volume II, ed. 1, p 367

    1. Yes the message about simplicity and bringing things back to a simplicity which has been ignored is an amazing tool for life. Thank you – Serge Benhayon.

    2. Well, on one hand I am glad I’m not the only one who got fooled by the apparently rogue ‘r’; on the other hand, it is really shocking how conditioned we are to compartmentalise, box in and narrow down everything; and I mean everything.

  33. The traditional 5 senses cannot reveal the truth alone, as it has an energetic basis and therefore the truth of all things is felt through our whole body and our clairsentient innate nature.

  34. Many of us undergo regular sight tests throughout our childhood and onwards as an adult, and it is usually a series of capital letters. Similar shapes like O and C can often be mistaken and it becomes a guessing game. We do that in life as well, we see something happening that we don’t understand and we make up stories that match our experiences of similar situations in order to feel that once we understand what’s going on, we can relax. But that may not be the truth. Having an open mind and allowing our senses to show us what is actually there, and feeling the energy, can mean we get a true picture and can respond accordingly.

  35. Feeling life is the most important thing we can do, when we allow ourselves to feel always our next step is one made with honesty and clarity. See what we want to see and life becomes a tricky illusion.

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