The Family Doctor

By Lee Green, Business Owner, Melbourne, Vic

The picture of the traditional family doctor is well known to us all – a General Practitioner that has a history of the family and is well versed in the ailments of all generations. This role is often depicted in period dramas, especially in well to do families of old – the visiting practitioner being the authority figure that knows ’health,’ or seemingly so, as is portrayed.

Interestingly, as illness and disease climb through the roof, the pressure on our worldwide medical systems is such that they veer closer to collapse – in effect a breakdown of a system that has been essentially supporting us to get on and function – the same system as portrayed by the family GP of old that we have given our power away to and expect to fix us and ready us for the next thing to do.

We have essentially made the role of the GP the first line of support – we take along our ailing bodies and ask for help. The appointments are often short, there is often a wait, and the GP may or may not be having a good or bad day; how they look after themselves in their important role of looking after other people is a key component to this particular element.

Another one being how we walk into the surgery ourselves.

Is the family doctor any more important than the person who checks us through at the supermarket? We are certainly all equal, yet some of us have learned skills that support us in different ways. One of the key factors in life that may skew our own views of the GP is that, with education, we place more status on the person – wrongly assuming that they are better than us because they know more about this particular subject or that.

Has there been too much emphasis placed on education and, in that, an assumed status of the person above others? This may or may not be held by the GP, but it sits as a construct in society and to some degree we may always look up to the family doctor as someone who knows more about our ailments than we do. This continues to feed this construct of superior status and does not support true equality in these relationships.

How many of us feel equal to the doctor when we sit talking about our own bodies? Do we allow ourselves to truly express all that we know about ourselves in that moment or do we hold back because we ‘don’t know’ as much as the highly qualified man or woman sitting in front of us?

Recently I attended a Chakra-puncture course, one of the many modalities offered by Universal Medicine, and heard one of the presenters, Serge Benhayon, say that the modalities and their original intent is for the domestic homes of all to truly support friends and family, as we require it through life.

What struck me about this and our current medical system is that all the pressure could be relieved if we all started to look at how we move ourselves around the planet. Are we truly taking care of ourselves? The answer has to be ‘no’ because of the state of our health as a society. Yet we continue to live in a way that results in more complex medical conditions.

How interesting is it then, that when we know truly what is and what is not good for our bodies and our health, we continue to live in a way that does not support a true state of health?

To start to heal how we have been living so that we may support and aid in the healing of another and another and so on, is the fundamental reason for us being here together on one planet.

This allowed me to feel that, as we develop ourselves, all of us the world over have the opportunity to connect with the modalities as taught by Serge Benhayon and Universal Medicine. We can build a different relationship with health within our family and friend groups. The understanding that we are responsible for all that the body is – that every ailment and dis-ease is a result of our choosing – can be communicated. The foods and drinks we consume, the way we handle our emotions, accept and appreciate ourselves, the way we walk etc. all have an amazing imprint for all to feel and see.

Although there will always be a need for General Practitioners and medical specialists, it becomes apparent that we all have our own inner “General Practitioner” and that within family groups of the future we will all be able to support each other with true healing modalities, family discussions that will evolve and grow each other, true counselling with each other with issues that come up to be revealed, worked on and let go of.

Herald in the new way

What a support this would ultimately be for the current long-suffering medical systems. Imagine taking ourselves to the GP knowing that ‘the way’ we live allows us to feel and present a body that is not ‘functioned’ out, but rather a loving body that is showing signs of illness and requires Western Medicine to support it.

There is no fix needed when the batteries have run down – the GP is not ticking another box and coping with another being needing fixing. There is a responsibility brought into the surgery and, as that is felt, the relationship between patient and the family doctor naturally returns to an equal footing. One knows their body intimately, inside and out, the other has the knowledge, skills and medicine to support the body back to physical health. Together the body benefits and becomes more harmonious as a result.

I am forever inspired and deeply appreciative of the work of Serge Benhayon and Universal Medicine.

 

898 thoughts on “The Family Doctor

  1. Our love lived is the greatest form of medicine. That’s why God bottled it and put it in our bodies, so that we would forever have the true elixir to life available on tap within. How important then is it to truly understand that there is not an ounce of emotion or self in such beholding love? If we are to truly heal ourselves and arrest our wayward ways that are impacting our bodies and the earth they walk upon, then we need to pay attention to the way we move about this planet and through our lives, be it in our homes or ‘out in the world’, there is no difference. Every move matters because it either expresses all that we are and thus has a healing effect on EVERYTHING or, it expresses all that we are not and therefore can only cause harm to all that moves alongside us in this great sphere of life we live within.

  2. ‘How many of us feel equal to the doctor when we sit talking about our own bodies? ‘ – this is a great question to ask and should be a question on medical forms! The truth is our bodies are constantly communicating to us about where we are at – but we have a choice to override this with someone else’s advice, or to honour what we feel.

  3. “Imagine taking ourselves to the GP knowing that ‘the way’ we live allows us to feel and present a body that is not ‘functioned’ out, but rather a loving body that is showing signs of illness and requires Western Medicine to support it.” Great point Lee, this allows the GP and the patient to clearly see the problem and not be distracted by the effects of living in disregard.

  4. The way we live and truly love ourselves and others, caring for our bodies, is certainly the way to go Lee! It is the greatest medicine on earth. All other medicine is a support and aid, and ‘patch-it-up’ commodity. But I have to say the old family GP who came to one’s house if you had measles or chicken pox, was one of the loveliest traditions. That way anyone contagious did not sit in a waiting room spreading it around, and a really ill person could stay in bed instead of dragging themselves to a surgery. We had a beautiful family doctor who used to ask me how my favourite teddy bear was doing. I really loved him. I wouldn’t throw that away, just simply add the true medicine of The Living Way into our lives!

  5. I love what Liane shares in a comment above, ‘Our love lived is the greatest form of medicine. That’s why God bottled it and put it in our bodies, so that we would forever have the true elixir to life available on tap within’. Wow, gorgeous. How we move in every second matters, and either harms or heals.

  6. It is very true Lee that our health starts and ends with ourselves and that we cannot expect another to fix it. The family doctor has been of immense support and service to countless families and still is. I would still love the doctor to visit me at home if I were to ever become too sick to drive to the clinic.. Yet, as you say, having a family doctor can sometimes mean that we do not take responsibility for our own health – we can trash our body and then expect the doctor to fix it: ‘We have essentially made the role of the GP the first line of support – we take along our ailing bodies and ask for help. The appointments are often short, there is often a wait, and the GP may or may not be having a good or bad day; how they look after themselves in their important role of looking after other people is a key component to this particular element.’ To impart true healing the doctor too needs to be living in a caring loving way, not telling patients to stop drinking for example, when they, the doctor, drinks too.

  7. Great call Lee for equality in our relationships, medical and otherwise and with that, the necessary responsibility of looking at the part that we have played in e.g. our dis-ease rather than taking our bodies to a ‘professional’ to be fixed. It makes so much sense that we are the experts on our own bodies but we sometimes need the support of others to heal, along with the willingness to look at how we have got to this point of un-wellness.

  8. To start to heal ourselves so that we can assist others in their own healing is true responsibility. This opportunity that we have each moment to make choices that either heal or harm continues to fascinate me every day: it’s nothing like I imagined it would be, but the most expansive, humbling, lightening of processes.
    Painful and uncomfortable at times as I’m faced with all my past choices, but each time I do, I feel lighter and more of myself, and more understanding of myself and others, than ever before.

  9. There can be no doubt that were we to all start taking responsibility for our own health the pressures on GPs would be greatly eased and instead of only being able to allow 10 minutes per consultation and limit the patient to one ailment per visit as they do in the UK – well certainly in my practice, GPs would be able to allocate time to a patient as they feel it is required, as no doubt they would have done in the past.

  10. I remember growing up the most important person to me was the cleaner but as you say Lee everyone is important and has their role to play. GPs are as a rule pretty awesome and do a wonderful job but we are not so good at doing our part of the job of responsibly looking after our bodies. I also love how the healing modalities that Serge Benhayon teaches so empowers us to be able to support ourselves and each other to do our part.

  11. At the moment there is this inequality when we visit our GP’s but what if we were to take more responsibility for our everyday well-being, wouldn’t it change the relationship we have with them and give them the space to talk to us freely about the workings of the body without having to hold back.

  12. It was not until I became aware of the huge support that Esoteric Medicine and the Esoteric modalities provided that I was able to hold myself in equalness with my GP. I had always been bombarded with the images and beliefs that the doctor would have the answer, would know what was the best point of call and would support me in the steps to take care of myself when recovering from an illness or disease. Yes I was given the Western Medicine support with medication and testing but the missing ingredient was why I allowed this condition to surface in the first place. That came from developing a deeper connection with myself and the choices I was making. I had to become the ‘body doctor’ first in order to get the treatment support my GP provided. What is great to appreciate now is that my relationship with my GP is about what our two halves bring to create the whole understanding. No longer treating the symptom but understanding the root cause.

  13. How amazing life would be if we all came to understand that “we all have our own inner General Practitioner”, that the way we live is our medicine and that our homes are our first line medical clinic. Yes, we can all be our own “family doctor” but at the same time accepting that there will be moments that we will need to take our care to the next level and utilise the wonderful support of the available medical services.

  14. “Imagine taking ourselves to the GP knowing that ‘the way’ we live allows us to feel and present a body that is not ‘functioned’ out, but rather a loving body that is showing signs of illness and requires Western Medicine to support it.” I love this. We are our own first line of support. Why is it we look outside ourselves first – for a quick fix? – when feeling into our lifestyle choices could be a good place to start to heal our ills.

  15. I can see how a new model within families that deal with health could start simply with sitting down to eat together at dinner and sharing how each person day went. It is very healing to feel listened to even if no solutions are given. We pay a lot of money to therapist to do this for us. Why not do this within our own families? Great blog Lee.

  16. I love what you share, that the patients “their body intimately, inside and out, the other has the knowledge, skills and medicine to support the body back to physical health.” other meaning the GP Doctor. Truth is without our own connection and knowing of our body, no true healing can take place. It is when we connect to our body we allow the healing to commence.

  17. The Family Doctor is a role that is pivotal to society. Society depends on it so much, and yet as individuals we can all choose to “participate in our own rescue” by making self-care part of our day.

  18. ‘We can build a different relationship with health within our family and friend groups.’ And we can do this by reflecting through our livingness that there is a way to live that is deeply nurturing and caring of our bodies

  19. ‘How many of us feel equal to the doctor when we sit talking about our own bodies? Do we allow ourselves to truly express all that we know about ourselves in that moment or do we hold back because we ‘don’t know’ as much as the highly qualified man or woman sitting in front of us?’ A beautiful question about our dependency on others when it comes to our own bodies dismissing the wisdom that is in us all equally.

  20. ‘How interesting is it then, that when we know truly what is and what is not good for our bodies and our health, we continue to live in a way that does not support a true state of health?’ Great question here Lee, all we need to do is to change some of our choices making them more about lovingly supporting ourselves and take responsibility for the choices we make.

  21. I agree Lee, we assume that people with more knowledge know more or are better than us but when it comes to our body we are the experts to know how and what we are truly feeling. It is important that we take responsibility and not disempower ourselves when we go to the doctors and ask them to fix us without looking at the situation we find ourselves in.

  22. The inner General Practitioner can provide much wisdom and is an important part of self-care and an overall approach to health.

  23. It seems like we have our Inner practitioner, our Universal Medicine practitioner and our General practitioner, (our doctor) and the combination of the three allows us great healing from all angles.

  24. I loved this question Lee, ‘Are we truly taking care of ourselves? The answer has to be ‘no’ because of the state of our health as a society.’ This is really highlighted by the strain on the health systems, when we don’t take any responsibility for ourselves and we expect the health system to fix us up and send us home.

  25. Yes, when I went to see my doctor (GP) recently I decided to go early, (about 15mins) before surgery started and was surprised to see that despite the drizzle of rain that morning there was a long queue waiting outside the doors, waiting to be let in. Apparently it is always like this now. There is extra staff in the surgery and yet the numbers of people coming outweigh those there to serve them. The National Health Service is being crippled by claims brought up against it. We do need to take the responsibility of our own care more firmly in our own hands and in so doing support the National Health Service to carry out it’s job less encumbered and potentially more enlightened.

  26. Our GP has a key role in the community including being a point of contact for onward referral. When we see our responsibility to our own health, our relationship with our GP can change from ‘fix me’ to ‘support me.’

  27. If we can nurture our authority and bring it to every situation in life we would be supporting ourselves enormously.

  28. What you have expressed here Lee is simple, true and wise, thank you. Our purpose and our challenge is certainly to heal ourselves and to live from the loving essence that we so truely are, thus evolving ourselves and others;
    “To start to heal how we have been living so that we may support and aid in the healing of another and another and so on, is the fundamental reason for us being here together on one planet”.

  29. This is where self-responsibility and the willingness to be an equal partner in the health equation come into play; the GP has the knowledge and experience and we have the everyday lived science of our body.

  30. This is such a great call for us all to step up and take on the responsibility we all in fact have, to reflect on openly and honestly the way we are living, the emotions we allow to run us through the hurts we are burying or avoiding to address, for ourselves first and then as a family. Who know us and our behaviours better than our families? How empowering would it be if we began to live in a way that focuses on bringing this openness, honesty and a willingness to heal to the table, so that we express to each other the truth we see and feel of the ill-momentums we get caught in, allowing us greater awareness of the loving and honoring choices we can make thereafter.

  31. ” Are we truly taking care of ourselves? The answer has to be ‘no’ because of the state of our health as a society. Yet we continue to live in a way that results in more complex medical conditions..” So true Lee. We continue to live recklessly, and expect the GP to fix us – an impossible task that is leading to bankruptcy in the health systems of the world. ‘Prevention is better than cure’ has been an epithet around for years, but we as a society don’t live this way. Enjoying the comfort of fast foods, sugar laden drinks, alcohol and drugs all hide a deeper malaise within society. What does it take to wake us up? Does cancer have to rise to one in two before this is so?

    1. Haven’t we already got cancer rates to one in two men over 55 years having prostate cancer and I believe one in eight women are getting breast cancer and no sign of mankind waking up to the mess we are in.

  32. To truly take back responsibility and care for our bodies is gold. What an amazing opportunity we have to not look at doctors as those who fix us but use them as part of the whole. The fact is that as soon as we give our power away to doctors, we are no longer in control or taking responsibility for our bodies. It is up to us to change the state of the healthcare system.

  33. It doesn’t seem that long ago to me that GPs visited patients at home when necessary and spent as long as was needed with each patient. It is very sad where we have got to with the 10 minutes maximum per session and only one condition can be asked about, but we need to realise that this is our fault not the medical systems because the way we have been living and then demanding to be fixed.

  34. ‘There is a responsibility brought into the surgery and, as that is felt, the relationship between patient and the family doctor naturally returns to an equal footing.’ I love this line because responsibly for our health has been ignored and so as our body is out of balance so is our relationship with health and the health service providers.

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