Are we sicker than we look?

By Joshua Campbell, Ghent, Belgium

Are we sicker than our eyes would have us believe? Are we very good at band aiding our ill conditions and making it seem like all is ok? These are questions I have been pondering on ever since I moved to Belgium from a small town in New Zealand.

When I was growing up in NZ it was common to see only one hospital in each city, with the exception of a few bigger cities like Auckland which has three and this makes sense given its population is over one million. However, in Ghent, the city I now live in, a city of only 300,000 people, there are a whopping four large hospitals each with the full catalogue of services and specialists that you would expect in any large hospital.

In addition, Ghent also has 6 health centres, each with numerous doctors and other specialists on top of the already large number of general doctors and other specialists practising in their own clinics around the city. And if that was not enough, there are also night doctors, dentists and pharmacies and if you really are stuck, it is only a short trip to another city close by, which like Ghent has yet more hospitals and specialists there.

This as you can imagine was vastly different from what I experienced growing up, yet is the norm for people here in Europe. Most do not even seem to question that such access to health care is a warning sign for humanity. The healthcare here is fantastic, no question, in fact it is excellent and I am not criticising this in any way, but what I am asking is: why do we need such a large range of healthcare services just to function as a society? Continue reading “Are we sicker than we look?”

Health and Life Today and through the Ages

By Johanna Smith B.Ed, Cert Early Childhood, Teacher, Rockingham, Perth WA.

I recently attended a Universal Medicine event day, where a photo from the 1960’s/70’s was presented alongside a discussion forum around health. This photo was of a group of young people who looked at ease with each other, had genuine smiles on their faces, were of a healthy weight range and their bodies reflected an openness and naturalness. The photo was really pleasant to see and reminded me of the feeling of being free in my body that I had when I was very young – something that could not be faked.

As a whole, we looked at the photo and shared what we saw before us. There was pretty much a consensus that this photo was sharing something that was not commonly seen in today’s society. It was not only showing how the individuals were, but it also revealed how they were with each other, how they felt and more importantly what they were reflecting about life back then. A way of life that, from this photo, seemed to support bodies to look and feel vital, engaged, open and ‘healthy.

Serge Benhayon then presented and facilitated us through a valuable workshop around the word ‘Health’. Much was discussed that was clear and made complete sense, yet some of it I had not really considered before. Continue reading “Health and Life Today and through the Ages”

What is the relationship between intelligence and health?

By Stephen Gammack, BSc 1st Class (Hons), Sydney

What is the relationship between health and intelligence? At the moment it might be said that the two stand separate and distinct, measured individually through various quantifiable tests and examinations, for e.g. a Health Examination and a School Examination. But is our idea of intelligence deeply flawed and far wide of the truth? What if it isn’t found in our ability with academia, but something inextricably linked to our health, the level of wellbeing we live in our bodies, the quality of energy we emanate in our daily life – the relationships and connections we form?

If you could, for example, write a highly academically acclaimed 10,000 word thesis on quantum physics, but at the same time choose to put your body in a state of stress and physical decline through lifestyle choices, then are you an intelligent being? Or to put it another way: are you a ‘being’ acting with your true capacity for intelligence? Maybe our approach to health and intelligence is all messed up and we need to teach, showcase and learn about intelligence from a completely different more self-regarding, or we could say loving, perspective.

The Philosopher Serge Benhayon has presented that our current model of intelligence is flawed, that we don’t think so much as we source thoughts through the movement of our body and that every movement is from one of two pools of energy that either harms (prana), or heals (fire). These energies by energetic law affect everyone, everywhere. To make sense of this requires a willingness to accept and understand that we live in a vast pool of energy and that how we move in every detail – our posture, our gentleness, our awareness, our intentions – influences our thoughts, which in turn create our choices – and that these choices then affect our health outcomes – every movement, every choice, every time. Continue reading “What is the relationship between intelligence and health?”