A true relationship with healing = true religion

by Jenny Ellis, Esoteric Practitioner, Brisbane

As someone who grew up without the influence of organised religion and in a largely atheist household, I had no meaningful experiences I would ever have called religious. I did however have a great deal of experience with what I might have once called healing, being involved in and passionate about health and fitness most of my younger life and studying natural medicine for several years.  To link the words religion and healing at the time however, could not have been more absurd in my view, and so to come to a point today where I now link healing and religion inextricably reflects a significant shift in my understanding.

When we think of healing, I dare say for most the word has lost its real meaning in everyday life and would be considered synonymous with the current dictionary offerings of: alleviating, palliating, easing, helping, softening, lessening, mitigating, attenuating, allaying and so on.

Historically in many cultures religion and healing have actually shared a close relationship. Shamans and priests held the power to ‘heal’ the sick through restoring the relationship of the individual with the unseen dimensions. A disturbance in this relationship was seen, and still is, amongst some religious enthusiasts as a valid cause of illness. Continue reading “A true relationship with healing = true religion”

What if the human life span keeps increasing?

by Rebecca Briant, Student and Receptionist, London, UK

The average life expectancy of humans is increasing at an unprecedented rate. Seen as one of the great achievements of the century, in the last 40 years alone it has risen by 10 years, and in 2011 life expectancy at birth was almost double what it was in 1841(1). But what will happen if our life span continues to increase, and how can we address the issues we will face?

As most people know, with age there comes a natural deterioration of the body. However, what we are already witnessing, and will see more of should trends continue to increase, is an unmanageable presence of chronic, multi-symptomatic conditions in our elderly and increasingly in younger people, which create a huge economic strain on the NHS. The annual cost of health and social care is far higher for elderly people, with more than two-fifths of the national health budget in the UK devoted to people over 65(2) and the number of older people in need of care is projected to rise by more than 60% in the next 20 years(3).

This strain will not be limited to the NHS alone, but will reach into wider society. In the UK the ratio of people of working age to people over 65 could fall from 3.7:1 in 1999 to 2.1:1 in 2040. This has the potential to drive up taxes for those in work, to be able to fund the increasing health and social care spending on the older population(4). There are also the implications on the wider health and social care systems to find long term care for the patients once they are discharged.

Continue reading “What if the human life span keeps increasing?”